Typology in Homoeopathy

Language
English
Type
Paperback
Publisher
Beaconsfield
Author(s) Léon Vannier
4 Items In stock
Delivery time 24 hours
$24.54
Typology, the classification of human beings according to their physical and psychological characteristics, is as old as medicine itself. It is particularly relevant to those forms of therapy which take account of the whole person. Dr Vannier attached great importance to the subject, believing that it could help the homoeopath to know the patient better, and the patient to perceive more clearly the full extent of his or her own potential.

He takes as his models the gods of Antiquity - Mars, Saturn, Apollo, Venus, Jupiter, Mercury, Luna and Terra - studying their mythological attributes as prototypes of the mental and physical characteristics of human beings. Each of these principal types is described at length under the following headings: physical make-up, morphology, intellect, character, the conditions and problems to which they are prone, and the changes that are likely to occur with age and circumstance. He then studies in detail the homoeopathic remedies to which the individual types respond best - usually a group of six to eight related remedies dominated by a major polychrest.

Dr Vannier makes it clear that no human being is a pure prototype, exhibiting one set of characteristics alone, and that in his view two, three or even four types will be found in one person, either together in varying degree, or else in succession. He describes briefly a number of 'metatypes' - combinations of prototypes - which he names after gods not included in the original eight.

The text is illustrated throughout with line drawings and photographs, showing how artists and sculptors from classical times until the present century have depicted the different types and their many variations.


'Typology is the classification of human beings according to their physical and psychological characteristics. The information is used to assess the individual person's strengths and weaknesses in order to provide informed counsel for restoring health, preventing disease, and reaching his or her own natural potential. Correlations abound with other whole-person therapies, and this volume concentrates on homeopathic remedies and the corresponding principal types to which they are similar.
Dr Vannier describes eight basic protoypes, named from Greek and Roman divinities, with definite individualising traits. ... He goes on to describe how the type presents in each of the constitutions, followed by studies of homeopathic remedies commonly needed by people with the characterisitics of the prototype. Often there is a central polychrest remedy which is frequently indicated as well as other adjunctive remedies. Rarely existing as a single pure prototype, most people display characteristics of two to four of these classifications. These prototypes are combined into metatypes which are also described in detail.
The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs and drawings, showing many examples of each type so that the reader can effectively integrate visual examples with the other information.
Typology in Homoeopathy is a unique, information-packed book which is off the beaten path of our collection of materia medica texts. It is a reference book which is easy to enjoy and yet, if studied in detail, can broaden our knowledge of the human condition.'

Resonance (USA)
More Information
ISBN9780906584309
AuthorLéon Vannier
TypePaperback
LanguageEnglish
Publication date1992-07
Pages176
PublisherBeaconsfield
Review

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the International Foundation for Homeopathy

reviewed by Wm. Mark Immel, ND, DHANP

Originally published in France in 1955, Dr. Marianne Harling has brought us the first English translation of -this interesting book.

Typology is the classification of human beings according to their physical and psychological characteristics. The information is used to assess the individual person's strengths and weaknesses in order to provide informed counsel for restoring health, preventing disease, and reaching his or her own natural potential.

Correlations abound with other whole-person therapies, and this volume concentrates on homeopathic remedies and the corresponding principal types to which they are similar.

He begins by describing three basic constitutional types, as originally described by Nebel: the Carbonic, the Phosphoric, and the Fluoric. The constitution is defined as being "that which is," representing characteristics we are born with that are essentially unchangeable.

The temperament is described as "that which becomes" and is a "dynamic evolution superimposed upon the static constitution." It is the sum of all which is variable in the patient.

The interaction between the constitution and the temperament is the subject of study and the foundation of the person's state of health.

Dr. Vannier describes eight basic prototypes, named from Greek and Roman divinities with definite individualizing traits. These are Mars, Saturn, Apollo, Venus, Jupiter, Mercury, Luna, and Terra. Each type is thoroughly described in terms of dominant characteristics, morphology, mind, character, diseases to which they are prone, and changes that commonly occur with age and in specific circumstances. There are also sections on how the type presents in the male and female, with descriptions of masculine and feminine traits which are likely to ruffle the feathers of some readers in our contemporary gender-conscious societies (not unknown in homeopathic literature!).

He goes on to describe how the type presents in each of the constitutions, followed by studies of homeopathic remedies commonly needed by people with the characteristics of the prototype. Often there is a central polychrest remedy which is frequently indicated, as well as other adjunctive remedies.

Rarely existing as a single pure prototype, most people display characteristics of two to four of these classifications. These prototypes are combined into metatypes which are also described in detail. The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs and drawings, showing many examples of each type so the reader can effectively integrate visual examples with the other information.

Typology in Homeopathy is a unique, information-packed book which is off the beaten path of our collection of materia medica texts. It is a reference book which is easy to enjoy and yet, if studied in detail, can broaden our knowledge of the human condition.

RESONANCE MARCH-APRIL 1993

 

This book review is reprinted from The Homoeopath with permission from Nick Churchill of The Society of Homoeopaths.

Reviewed by Carol Wise

I have laboured with my basic French for long enough to feel quite liberated by this very readable first translation of an old classic in homoeopathic teaching, by Dr Marianne Harling, BM, BCh, FFHom. Dr Vannier was a master of homoeopathy in his day - he started practising in 1905 and died in 1963 having made a large contribution to the spread of homoeopathic medicine in France. His many books on materia medica and philosophy include Homeopathie, Medicine Humaine, later published in English but now regrettably out of print. It forms a more scholarly foundation for this book.

This more visual and approachable version of his philosophy was first in print in 1955 (Doin Editeurs) and proves to be more user friendly. It has many well-reproduced illustrations from the French original. The book is a hypothetical classification of human beings both physically and psychologically using Graeco-Roman deities as the models. Vannier's ideas about constitutions arise out of his knowledge of the work of von Grauvogl (A Text Book of Homoeopathy 1865) a somewhat heavy volume to tackle, and partly from his practice of insisting that all patients completely strip at their first consultation.

Dr J. H. Clarke was also strongly influenced by Grauvogl and expounds the same philosophy in his book Constitutional Medicine. It has the advantage in my view of 'cases and comparisons taken from life' to demonstrate the practicality of the philosophy. The Indians, not to be left out have contributed Dr R. K. Mukerji's Constitution and Temperament 1974, which extends the morphological description to hands and includes gleanings on the subject from other French sources.

The useful message of the book is the idea of distinguishing categories of information commonly attributed to the 'constitution' in general by making it clear that the constitution is that part of the person that is observed, constant and cannot be changed. Personality is that which develops and adapts therefore being the area subject to dynamic influence. Temperament consists of the potential qualities that lead us on to an appropriate or inappropriate path, thus explaining susceptibility at least on the psychological level.

The fascination of applying Graeco-Roman archetypes is an important exercise in observational skills, if not in actually finding the remedy. The generalizations of attributes of people, as in astrology, stimulate the mind to focus but are not necessarily giving absolute pictures, only a guide to understanding.

I found it interesting as a materia medica of healthy people as well as explaining the relationships or groupings of remedies. Academic life aside I really need the practicalities of Clarke's approach, although limited in his book and I would have appreciated some of Vannier's cases. This is yet another helpful tool for those studying the complexities of the homoeopathic detective story and particularly if one can make connections with ancient mythology. A book priced for enthusiasts.

Carol Wise RSHom is a Director of the Yorkshire School of Homoeopathy, practising in Burley-in-Wharfedale and Leeds.

The Homoeopath Vol.13 No.1 1993

 

This book review is reprinted from the British Homoeopathic Journal Volume 82, Number 1, January 1993, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

It is good that this classic work from the French school of homoeopathy has been made available in English, admirably translated by Marianne Harling. The work was originally published in France in 1955 and is the mature achievement of one of the acknowledged teachers of French homoeopathy. Homoeopathy developed very differently in different countries according to the talents and genius of those nationalities.

In France, the study of human types, constitutions and temperaments contributed a major component to the typically French homoeopathy. As this vast subject has been taken up in many varied ways over the centuries it is understandable that it was also taken up differently by divergent schools within French homoeopathy. A very helpful review of these tendencies and doctrines by Dr Roland Zissu appeared in the British Homoeopathic Journal Vol. 50 in January 1961. 1 feel that this review would be a helpful contribution to anyone trying to find their way into this book.

British homoeopathy has been dominated for at least seventy years by American Kentianism, though it had a most fruitful and typically British period before this intrusion. It is important that English homoeopaths should also gain some familiarity with this quite distinct French stream. I can think of few better introductions than this book. In addition to the text in which the types are characterized systematically, they are fascinatingly illustrated by drawings and reproductions of works of art. This makes what could be an over-systematized system for British readers into a delightful and stimulating study.

The types with which this book is mainly concerned are based upon the Greek gods and goddesses. Some 20 odd prototypes and metatypes are described under the headings dominant characteristics, morphology, mental characteristics and character, then as manifesting in woman as well as man, leading on to the typical diseases and remedies of the type. The types or archetypes, of course, are not actual individuals, but the individual manifests the interplay and mixture of a number of these types. Often one type, one Greek god, dominates the phenomena.

It is interesting, amongst other things, to compare the homoeopathic medicines associated with the types with the picture of the same medicine more familiar to us in this country. For instance Lycopodium appears as the central remedy of the Mars type characterized by such features as aggressive, impulsive, violent and rough. I have the impression that we are more familiar with an anxious, over-intellectual, apprehensive creature wanting to be alone, provided someone else is in the next room! Medicines and people seem to take on national characteristics.

The use of the word temperament diverges from its traditional usage. Running through the descriptions are the basic constitutions of Vannier's system. These are grasped as structural, physical patterns on which the types of this book play. They are the Carbonic, the Fluoric, and the Phosphoric. The types then play upon these basic, largely hereditary, instruments. Vannier characterizes the constitution as that which is, the temperament as that which becomes. One of the most valuable contributions in this way of looking at things arises from this. Vannier is looking for the realm of the possible, not only the necessary; what someone can evolve into presents true healing.

I feel that this book can be of real help to any homoeopath seeking to get beyond the over simplistic idea of treating the individual. Between our unique individuality and our common humanity are all the complex groups to which we belong: sex, age, race, nation, class, temperament, psychological type and so on. Our troubles arise from the conflicts and misunderstandings between these, not from our humanity or our uniqueness. So it is opportune that this excellent, readable translation of Vannier's classic should appear in English. May it stimluate thought and observation rather than slavish satisfaction that the system is a complete one.

RALPH TWENTYMAN

British Homoeopathic Journal
Volume 82, Number 1, January 1993

Review

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the International Foundation for Homeopathy

reviewed by Wm. Mark Immel, ND, DHANP

Originally published in France in 1955, Dr. Marianne Harling has brought us the first English translation of -this interesting book.

Typology is the classification of human beings according to their physical and psychological characteristics. The information is used to assess the individual person's strengths and weaknesses in order to provide informed counsel for restoring health, preventing disease, and reaching his or her own natural potential.

Correlations abound with other whole-person therapies, and this volume concentrates on homeopathic remedies and the corresponding principal types to which they are similar.

He begins by describing three basic constitutional types, as originally described by Nebel: the Carbonic, the Phosphoric, and the Fluoric. The constitution is defined as being "that which is," representing characteristics we are born with that are essentially unchangeable.

The temperament is described as "that which becomes" and is a "dynamic evolution superimposed upon the static constitution." It is the sum of all which is variable in the patient.

The interaction between the constitution and the temperament is the subject of study and the foundation of the person's state of health.

Dr. Vannier describes eight basic prototypes, named from Greek and Roman divinities with definite individualizing traits. These are Mars, Saturn, Apollo, Venus, Jupiter, Mercury, Luna, and Terra. Each type is thoroughly described in terms of dominant characteristics, morphology, mind, character, diseases to which they are prone, and changes that commonly occur with age and in specific circumstances. There are also sections on how the type presents in the male and female, with descriptions of masculine and feminine traits which are likely to ruffle the feathers of some readers in our contemporary gender-conscious societies (not unknown in homeopathic literature!).

He goes on to describe how the type presents in each of the constitutions, followed by studies of homeopathic remedies commonly needed by people with the characteristics of the prototype. Often there is a central polychrest remedy which is frequently indicated, as well as other adjunctive remedies.

Rarely existing as a single pure prototype, most people display characteristics of two to four of these classifications. These prototypes are combined into metatypes which are also described in detail. The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs and drawings, showing many examples of each type so the reader can effectively integrate visual examples with the other information.

Typology in Homeopathy is a unique, information-packed book which is off the beaten path of our collection of materia medica texts. It is a reference book which is easy to enjoy and yet, if studied in detail, can broaden our knowledge of the human condition.

RESONANCE MARCH-APRIL 1993

 

This book review is reprinted from The Homoeopath with permission from Nick Churchill of The Society of Homoeopaths.

Reviewed by Carol Wise

I have laboured with my basic French for long enough to feel quite liberated by this very readable first translation of an old classic in homoeopathic teaching, by Dr Marianne Harling, BM, BCh, FFHom. Dr Vannier was a master of homoeopathy in his day - he started practising in 1905 and died in 1963 having made a large contribution to the spread of homoeopathic medicine in France. His many books on materia medica and philosophy include Homeopathie, Medicine Humaine, later published in English but now regrettably out of print. It forms a more scholarly foundation for this book.

This more visual and approachable version of his philosophy was first in print in 1955 (Doin Editeurs) and proves to be more user friendly. It has many well-reproduced illustrations from the French original. The book is a hypothetical classification of human beings both physically and psychologically using Graeco-Roman deities as the models. Vannier's ideas about constitutions arise out of his knowledge of the work of von Grauvogl (A Text Book of Homoeopathy 1865) a somewhat heavy volume to tackle, and partly from his practice of insisting that all patients completely strip at their first consultation.

Dr J. H. Clarke was also strongly influenced by Grauvogl and expounds the same philosophy in his book Constitutional Medicine. It has the advantage in my view of 'cases and comparisons taken from life' to demonstrate the practicality of the philosophy. The Indians, not to be left out have contributed Dr R. K. Mukerji's Constitution and Temperament 1974, which extends the morphological description to hands and includes gleanings on the subject from other French sources.

The useful message of the book is the idea of distinguishing categories of information commonly attributed to the 'constitution' in general by making it clear that the constitution is that part of the person that is observed, constant and cannot be changed. Personality is that which develops and adapts therefore being the area subject to dynamic influence. Temperament consists of the potential qualities that lead us on to an appropriate or inappropriate path, thus explaining susceptibility at least on the psychological level.

The fascination of applying Graeco-Roman archetypes is an important exercise in observational skills, if not in actually finding the remedy. The generalizations of attributes of people, as in astrology, stimulate the mind to focus but are not necessarily giving absolute pictures, only a guide to understanding.

I found it interesting as a materia medica of healthy people as well as explaining the relationships or groupings of remedies. Academic life aside I really need the practicalities of Clarke's approach, although limited in his book and I would have appreciated some of Vannier's cases. This is yet another helpful tool for those studying the complexities of the homoeopathic detective story and particularly if one can make connections with ancient mythology. A book priced for enthusiasts.

Carol Wise RSHom is a Director of the Yorkshire School of Homoeopathy, practising in Burley-in-Wharfedale and Leeds.

The Homoeopath Vol.13 No.1 1993

 

This book review is reprinted from the British Homoeopathic Journal Volume 82, Number 1, January 1993, with permission from Peter Fisher, Editor.

It is good that this classic work from the French school of homoeopathy has been made available in English, admirably translated by Marianne Harling. The work was originally published in France in 1955 and is the mature achievement of one of the acknowledged teachers of French homoeopathy. Homoeopathy developed very differently in different countries according to the talents and genius of those nationalities.

In France, the study of human types, constitutions and temperaments contributed a major component to the typically French homoeopathy. As this vast subject has been taken up in many varied ways over the centuries it is understandable that it was also taken up differently by divergent schools within French homoeopathy. A very helpful review of these tendencies and doctrines by Dr Roland Zissu appeared in the British Homoeopathic Journal Vol. 50 in January 1961. 1 feel that this review would be a helpful contribution to anyone trying to find their way into this book.

British homoeopathy has been dominated for at least seventy years by American Kentianism, though it had a most fruitful and typically British period before this intrusion. It is important that English homoeopaths should also gain some familiarity with this quite distinct French stream. I can think of few better introductions than this book. In addition to the text in which the types are characterized systematically, they are fascinatingly illustrated by drawings and reproductions of works of art. This makes what could be an over-systematized system for British readers into a delightful and stimulating study.

The types with which this book is mainly concerned are based upon the Greek gods and goddesses. Some 20 odd prototypes and metatypes are described under the headings dominant characteristics, morphology, mental characteristics and character, then as manifesting in woman as well as man, leading on to the typical diseases and remedies of the type. The types or archetypes, of course, are not actual individuals, but the individual manifests the interplay and mixture of a number of these types. Often one type, one Greek god, dominates the phenomena.

It is interesting, amongst other things, to compare the homoeopathic medicines associated with the types with the picture of the same medicine more familiar to us in this country. For instance Lycopodium appears as the central remedy of the Mars type characterized by such features as aggressive, impulsive, violent and rough. I have the impression that we are more familiar with an anxious, over-intellectual, apprehensive creature wanting to be alone, provided someone else is in the next room! Medicines and people seem to take on national characteristics.

The use of the word temperament diverges from its traditional usage. Running through the descriptions are the basic constitutions of Vannier's system. These are grasped as structural, physical patterns on which the types of this book play. They are the Carbonic, the Fluoric, and the Phosphoric. The types then play upon these basic, largely hereditary, instruments. Vannier characterizes the constitution as that which is, the temperament as that which becomes. One of the most valuable contributions in this way of looking at things arises from this. Vannier is looking for the realm of the possible, not only the necessary; what someone can evolve into presents true healing.

I feel that this book can be of real help to any homoeopath seeking to get beyond the over simplistic idea of treating the individual. Between our unique individuality and our common humanity are all the complex groups to which we belong: sex, age, race, nation, class, temperament, psychological type and so on. Our troubles arise from the conflicts and misunderstandings between these, not from our humanity or our uniqueness. So it is opportune that this excellent, readable translation of Vannier's classic should appear in English. May it stimluate thought and observation rather than slavish satisfaction that the system is a complete one.

RALPH TWENTYMAN

British Homoeopathic Journal
Volume 82, Number 1, January 1993