Horses and Homeopathy - A Pocket Guide

Language
English
Type
Paperback
Publisher
Saltire Books
Author(s) Tim Couzens
5 Items In stock
Delivery time 24 hours
$21.83

Horses are unique animals which have evolved and adapted to a huge range of environments and lifestyles. Homeopathy too has evolved – we have expanded and added to our knowledge of the remedies since Hahnemann’s time. We understand them more intrinsically and can apply them more effectively in treating ill health and disease through a deeper insight.

In this handy guide, Tim Couzens has brought together information from over 20 years experience in veterinary practice. Each chapter covers a different area of the body or system, as well as infectious diseases, the foal, behavioural problems and first aid. Under each section are brief descriptions of common problems listed next to the suggested remedy, potency and dose in a comprehensible, easy-to-use format. With experience and a good basic knowledge of equine health problems, careful observation and detailed remedy knowledge, readers can use the information to help treat, resolve or provide support for a vast range of conditions.

This book fulfils a need for a quick, accurate, practical and up to date book that should appeal to a wide audience - owners, yard managers and veterinary surgeons alike.

More Information
ISBN9780955906541
AuthorTim Couzens
TypePaperback
LanguageEnglish
Publication date2011-03-03
Pages160
PublisherSaltire Books
Review

This book review is reprinted from Volume 30, Number 3 , Year 2011 edition of The Homeopath

Reviewed by Nick Thompson

If you want a concise comprehensive pocket guide to homeopathic treatment of conditions in the horse, this is the booklet for you. For the lorry or the tack room, this small volume packs a lot of punch.

If you're looking for something to teach you about homeopathy and its' application to horses, then spend a little more and invest in Tim's 2006 definitive volume Homeopathy for Horses (Kenilworth Press).

Tim's breadth of remedy selection is refreshing; he's looking beyond the normal scope to select his medicines. To his credit, for example, he suggests Sulphuric add'for severe trauma and for severe bleeding in the eye.

I had the honour of revising and updating George Madeod's 'The Treatment of Horses by Homeopathy in 2005 (Rider Books) and can tell you for a fact that George didn't mention it in his section on eye pathology. In George's defense, however, he does mention Sul-ac in his Veterinary Materia Media (C.W. Daniel Company Ltd., 1983) in this context. It's great to see useful remedies being dusted off and seeing the light of equine day in the 21st century.

Other broad thinking by Tim in this Guide is demonstrated in his useful suggestions in the Gastric Ulceration section of the bowel nosode Dys Co, Uranium nitrate or Omithogalum. It would appear that in George's day, the condition was not even recognised, he not even mentioning it in his earlier works. (Isn't it remarkable how one's world view is dictated by the instruments at hand with which to view it?)

Tim enhances the palate of remedies the modern equine homeopath has at their disposal. Fascinating suggestions include Angustura vera for osteoarthritis/DJD where the joints crack, with Benzoic acid for 'distorted joints that crack, especially the knee joint', and Lithium carbonicum for 'arthritis accompanied by bony nodosities affecting the hock (especially) and fetlock, coffin and pastern joints to a lesser extent. Fantastic stuff; food for thought.

If I may be so bold, for the second edition of this useful Pocket Guide, I would suggest the author considers expanding his section on Behavior. Unlike Macleod, and to his credit, he has a section dealing with psychological pathology. However, behaviour is such an essential part of modern equine management, not to mention holistic medicine, that I feel we are ill serving our public and our patients if we do not afford them as much information as possible, if we do not make understanding and prescribing for these conditions as simple as possible.

Equally, an enhanced and expanded index would facilitate the simple use of this otherwise essential Guide. A list of essential remedies, a first aid kit, to have at hand in the tack room would, I think, not be out of place, even in this small guide, as would a short list of recommended reading. This Guide may be the first book that a budding equine homeopath may pick up. It would be a shame to limit their homeopathic worldview at the first hurdle.

In closing, I cannot recommend this economic Pocket Guide enough for ready reference. Use it in conjunction with Tim's understandable text on the subject and you will have a grounding, in this most fascinating of subjects, second to none.

Review

This book review is reprinted from Volume 30, Number 3 , Year 2011 edition of The Homeopath

Reviewed by Nick Thompson

If you want a concise comprehensive pocket guide to homeopathic treatment of conditions in the horse, this is the booklet for you. For the lorry or the tack room, this small volume packs a lot of punch.

If you're looking for something to teach you about homeopathy and its' application to horses, then spend a little more and invest in Tim's 2006 definitive volume Homeopathy for Horses (Kenilworth Press).

Tim's breadth of remedy selection is refreshing; he's looking beyond the normal scope to select his medicines. To his credit, for example, he suggests Sulphuric add'for severe trauma and for severe bleeding in the eye.

I had the honour of revising and updating George Madeod's 'The Treatment of Horses by Homeopathy in 2005 (Rider Books) and can tell you for a fact that George didn't mention it in his section on eye pathology. In George's defense, however, he does mention Sul-ac in his Veterinary Materia Media (C.W. Daniel Company Ltd., 1983) in this context. It's great to see useful remedies being dusted off and seeing the light of equine day in the 21st century.

Other broad thinking by Tim in this Guide is demonstrated in his useful suggestions in the Gastric Ulceration section of the bowel nosode Dys Co, Uranium nitrate or Omithogalum. It would appear that in George's day, the condition was not even recognised, he not even mentioning it in his earlier works. (Isn't it remarkable how one's world view is dictated by the instruments at hand with which to view it?)

Tim enhances the palate of remedies the modern equine homeopath has at their disposal. Fascinating suggestions include Angustura vera for osteoarthritis/DJD where the joints crack, with Benzoic acid for 'distorted joints that crack, especially the knee joint', and Lithium carbonicum for 'arthritis accompanied by bony nodosities affecting the hock (especially) and fetlock, coffin and pastern joints to a lesser extent. Fantastic stuff; food for thought.

If I may be so bold, for the second edition of this useful Pocket Guide, I would suggest the author considers expanding his section on Behavior. Unlike Macleod, and to his credit, he has a section dealing with psychological pathology. However, behaviour is such an essential part of modern equine management, not to mention holistic medicine, that I feel we are ill serving our public and our patients if we do not afford them as much information as possible, if we do not make understanding and prescribing for these conditions as simple as possible.

Equally, an enhanced and expanded index would facilitate the simple use of this otherwise essential Guide. A list of essential remedies, a first aid kit, to have at hand in the tack room would, I think, not be out of place, even in this small guide, as would a short list of recommended reading. This Guide may be the first book that a budding equine homeopath may pick up. It would be a shame to limit their homeopathic worldview at the first hurdle.

In closing, I cannot recommend this economic Pocket Guide enough for ready reference. Use it in conjunction with Tim's understandable text on the subject and you will have a grounding, in this most fascinating of subjects, second to none.