Homoeopathy in Practice

Language
English
Type
Paperback
Publisher
Beaconsfield
5 Items In stock
Delivery time 24 hours
$15.93
What remedies should you keep for the emergencies of general practice? How does the homoeopath treat pain? What can homoeopathy offer for gastroenteritis or the common cold, or for virus infection in general? How do you distinguish between the remedies? The author covers a wide variety of the complaints and disorders that are commonly seen in general practice, with detailed guidance on their treatment by homoeopathy. He then studies a number of major groups of related remedies, analysing the characteristics they have in common and those that differentiate between them.

Dr Borland qualified MB, ChB at Glasgow University in 1909. After various hospital posts he went to Chicago to study under Dr Kent, going as an open-minded sceptic and returning as an astonished and convinced homoeopath. He then took an appointment at the London Homoeopathic Hospital, followed by active service during World War I with the Royal Army Medical Corps. After the war he established a consultant practice in London and returned to the staff of the London Homoeopathic Hospital, where he subsequently became senior consultant physician and chairman of the staff.


'The book comprises some fourteen chapters, nine devoted to a study of various clinical conditions, and five to studies and comparisons of remedies. Even when the conditions are common and we all have to deal with them daily, the treatment is fresh and there are unusual angles on well known remedies and interesting comparisons on smaller remedies.'

The Homoeopath
More Information
ISBN9780906584064
AuthorDouglas M. Borland
TypePaperback
LanguageEnglish
Publication date1981-11-27
Pages208
PublisherBeaconsfield
Review

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the International Foundation for Homeopathy

Reviewed by Michael Carlston, MD, DHt

I have the pleasure of reviewing Dr. Douglas Borland's Homeopathy in Practice. The book was edited by Dr. Kathleen Priestman from shorthand notes of Dr. Borland's lectures. Dr. Priestman is well suited for the task by virtue of her homeopathic experience and, most especially, by her contact with Dr. Borland, including attendance at some of the very lectures included in this text.

The first nine chapters are problem based-injuries and emergencies, headaches, sore throats, respiratory conditions, heart conditions, the gastro-intestinal tract, obstetrics and some gynecological conditions, sleeplessness, and pre- and post-operative treatment. The selection of topics appears to have been intended to cover the broad range of pathological conditions but the depth of the considerations varies quite widely.

The first chapter, for example, is essentially brief snippets of advanced homeopathic first aid. It would be most useful to a practitioner of limited clinical experience. A more experienced homeopath could still benefit by studying this chapter, but to a limited degree.

Throughout the book, one of the finest features for recommending it is the comparison between remedies. In the first half of the book the comparisons are between remedies organized by the subject conditions. The book is indexed both by remedy name and symptom, making it a quick reference. Some might criticize any consideration of remedies from the perspective of diagnosis as not being truly "homeopathic." Although it is very important to respect the individuality of each patient and to make new discoveries about the utility of each remedy at our disposal, certain medicines are uniquely prevalent among patients with certain diseases.

The process of learning homeopathic clinical practice is one of gaining experience with the application of materia medica. Each homeopath develops a "palette" of remedies for the problems his or her patients present. Every text that discusses car infections, for example, will list a unique group of appropriate remedies. The naive homeopathic student can become hopelessly confused when attempting to decide which of these renowned past homeopaths was right and which was wrong. In actuality, they were all correct. Studying the thoughts of an acknowledged master, like Dr. Borland, can help even a very good homeopath to realize which part of the spectrum his usual remedy choices do not adequately cover and which remedies might aptly fill in the gaps. This is most true of acute illnesses.

The chapter entitled simply Heart Conditions is easily the best essay on cardiovascular material in our literature. Its ten pages should be memorized by any homeopath treating patients with heart failure or angina.

Occasionally some effort is made to distinguish one remedy from another with very little success. For example in the headache lecture regarding Spigelia, "It is described as a sensation as if the eye was too big for its socket. This is a distinguishing point from Sanguinaria, in which there is a feeling of the eye being pushed out." Such discrimination appears excessive. However, occasionally, a patient might use exactly the words recorded in our literature.

When treating chronic disease, subtle distinctions become geometrically increased in importance. Achieving a lasting cure for the patient requires prescribing excellence. Dr. Borland's book is most helpful in this area as well. Included are two chapters on comparative materia medica which should help practitioners to broaden themselves beyond the routine members of two of our remedy "families." One addresses the Kali salts. The other considers the Natrums.

We must avail ourselves of the expertise of the past so that we can add to and refine that knowledge. The loss of inter-generational transmission of clinical expertise is a blow from which we are still trying to recover. It is impossible to overemphasize the importance of maintaining written records of the clinical experience of homeopathic masters so we do not have to rediscover fire continually.

The book, Homeopathy in Practice is a fine contribution to homeopathic literature and would be a welcome addition to the library of nearly any homeopath.

Review

This book review is reprinted with the permission of the International Foundation for Homeopathy

Reviewed by Michael Carlston, MD, DHt

I have the pleasure of reviewing Dr. Douglas Borland's Homeopathy in Practice. The book was edited by Dr. Kathleen Priestman from shorthand notes of Dr. Borland's lectures. Dr. Priestman is well suited for the task by virtue of her homeopathic experience and, most especially, by her contact with Dr. Borland, including attendance at some of the very lectures included in this text.

The first nine chapters are problem based-injuries and emergencies, headaches, sore throats, respiratory conditions, heart conditions, the gastro-intestinal tract, obstetrics and some gynecological conditions, sleeplessness, and pre- and post-operative treatment. The selection of topics appears to have been intended to cover the broad range of pathological conditions but the depth of the considerations varies quite widely.

The first chapter, for example, is essentially brief snippets of advanced homeopathic first aid. It would be most useful to a practitioner of limited clinical experience. A more experienced homeopath could still benefit by studying this chapter, but to a limited degree.

Throughout the book, one of the finest features for recommending it is the comparison between remedies. In the first half of the book the comparisons are between remedies organized by the subject conditions. The book is indexed both by remedy name and symptom, making it a quick reference. Some might criticize any consideration of remedies from the perspective of diagnosis as not being truly "homeopathic." Although it is very important to respect the individuality of each patient and to make new discoveries about the utility of each remedy at our disposal, certain medicines are uniquely prevalent among patients with certain diseases.

The process of learning homeopathic clinical practice is one of gaining experience with the application of materia medica. Each homeopath develops a "palette" of remedies for the problems his or her patients present. Every text that discusses car infections, for example, will list a unique group of appropriate remedies. The naive homeopathic student can become hopelessly confused when attempting to decide which of these renowned past homeopaths was right and which was wrong. In actuality, they were all correct. Studying the thoughts of an acknowledged master, like Dr. Borland, can help even a very good homeopath to realize which part of the spectrum his usual remedy choices do not adequately cover and which remedies might aptly fill in the gaps. This is most true of acute illnesses.

The chapter entitled simply Heart Conditions is easily the best essay on cardiovascular material in our literature. Its ten pages should be memorized by any homeopath treating patients with heart failure or angina.

Occasionally some effort is made to distinguish one remedy from another with very little success. For example in the headache lecture regarding Spigelia, "It is described as a sensation as if the eye was too big for its socket. This is a distinguishing point from Sanguinaria, in which there is a feeling of the eye being pushed out." Such discrimination appears excessive. However, occasionally, a patient might use exactly the words recorded in our literature.

When treating chronic disease, subtle distinctions become geometrically increased in importance. Achieving a lasting cure for the patient requires prescribing excellence. Dr. Borland's book is most helpful in this area as well. Included are two chapters on comparative materia medica which should help practitioners to broaden themselves beyond the routine members of two of our remedy "families." One addresses the Kali salts. The other considers the Natrums.

We must avail ourselves of the expertise of the past so that we can add to and refine that knowledge. The loss of inter-generational transmission of clinical expertise is a blow from which we are still trying to recover. It is impossible to overemphasize the importance of maintaining written records of the clinical experience of homeopathic masters so we do not have to rediscover fire continually.

The book, Homeopathy in Practice is a fine contribution to homeopathic literature and would be a welcome addition to the library of nearly any homeopath.