Gifts of the Mother - Matridonal Remedies of the Human Family

Language
English
Type
Paperback
Publisher
Melissa Assilem
Author(s) Melissa Assilem
5+ Items In stock
Delivery time 24 hours
$24.95
This is the newest of Melissa's books, years in its conception. It pulls together strands to weave into the story of the Matridonal Remedies, part of the Humanum Family:

Lac Humanum
Folliculinum
Placenta Humana (Welsh)
Vernix Caseosa
Amniota Humana
Umbilicus Humanus

'As I have worked with these important remedies over the years, I have come to believe that the most profound gift we as humans receive is the sense of self. It is first bestowed in its earthly form in the womb. Could it not therefore be true that when this sense of self is lost, it can be retrieved through the very materials that gave it to us in the first place? These substances are made for the creation of our humanness. It is their sole purpose, as they are discarded as soon as we no longer need them. '
More Information
ISBN9781886546066
AuthorMelissa Assilem
TypePaperback
LanguageEnglish
Publication date2009
Pages136
PublisherMelissa Assilem
Review

This book review is reprinted from Volume 104, Number 2 summer 2011 Edition, with permission from American Journal of Homeopathic Medicine.

Reviewed by Jay Yasgur, RPh, MSc

Matridonal Remedies of the Humanum Family is the third book by Ms. Assilem and, just like the first two, The Mad Hatter's Tea Party (1994) and Women Ripening Through the Menopause (1996) (each has been revised several times), is quirky, amusing and overflowing with wisdom. This latest addition, subtitled' Gifts of the Mother,' concerns six remedies, Lac humanum, Folliculinum, Placenta humana, Vernix caseosa, Amniotic fluid, and Umbilical cord. These chapters are interspersed with several others; i.e., The Humanum Family, Enhanced Proofings, and Coming Into My Own (a lengthy case).

Right away, in her Foreword, Assilem makes the case for using the word 'proofing' instead of 'proving.'
"I use the word 'proof throughout the book, because for me is (sic) says so much better than 'prove.' To 'prove' something sounds too much as if one is testing something, which smacks of a trial. I think of a 'proofing,' as being about stepping into the energy of a substance and recording it. A 'proofreader' is someone looking over information before it is put into use. A 'proof has been described as a record of a journey in which someone has discovered an important truth, and made a record of that journey adequate enough so that a second person can walk a similar path and see a similar truth. Doesn't that sound so much more similar to what we are doing? In Chapter Six you will find my own story of the evolution of provings into what I call 'Enhanced Proofings.'"-M. Assilem, p. viii.

Matridonal remedies ('gifts of the mother') are remedies we are all familiar with on some level. Whether we've taken them or allowed them to nurture or connect, the author makes the point that there are times in our lives when we will all need them as remedies.

Upon reading the list of remedies, one finds an unfamiliar one, Vernix caseosa-the cheesy layer of 'grease' we are covered with upon our birth; a 'cheesy varnish.' Assilem calls it "The Protector' and identifies it with the following themes-unprotected, assaulted, no sense of self, skin-before presenting a case of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Like her first two books, this one is no different; it is filled with striking metaphor. As long as you give it some berth and an open mind, many 'gifts' will flow forth.

"These Matridonal remedies are about loving ourselves and loving others from a place of strength."- p. 67.

These 'lessons' are something all of us need to re-learn everyday. We need to constantly remind ourselves to 'love me,' to 'be gentle to me.' That's what everyone-the entire world-wants anyway, isn't it? More love, more kindness. Every page acted as a reminder. Well, at least to me.

This book review is reprinted with the permission from the Winter 2009 Edition of The Homeopath.

Reviewed by Jo Crocker

In this book Melissa Assilem tells the story of the homeopathic remedies of the human family - Lac humanum, Folliculinum, Placenta humana, Vernix caseosa humana, Aqua amniota humana and Umbilicus humanus. The aim, writes Melissa, is to give us insights into how these remedies have shaped our lives, connecting us to our evolution, genesis, incarnation and how they are able to reconnect us to our life purpose. As she puts it: "The story told through these remedies - of connecting with the earthly journey of our soul."

Melissa begins with an overview, drawing and connecting this group of remedies together under the classification 'The human family', and she tells us of the human story of evolution, which forms a broad signature of this group of remedies. There is a spiritual aspect to the book, each chapter beginning and ending with a poem which sets the scene of the remedy. There is also a summary of the remedy, and although some have a discussion on differentials and suggested rubrics, it would have been useful to have this for all the remedies.

The book then gives us an overview of each remedy and states to be treated. The chapter on Vernix also has remedy relationships, which would have been valuable for the other remedies. We are then presented with some cases in which patients have transformed their health and lives, but I would have liked to hear about their physical pathology. The chapters on Aqua amniota humana and Umbilical humanus were more fleshed out and I would have liked to have seen this treatment given to the other remedies, as, although they are better known, their use is still limited due to the little information known about them and proven cases.

Although it is clear that Melissa carried out indepth research and immersed herself in these remedies, and much of the information presented is both useful and fascinating, I sometimes found it difficult to separate the language of the remedy from Melissa's own voice in the book. The referencing of literature about each remedy is of variable quality, there are spelling mistakes, the most persistent being prooving and proofer for proving and prover. This appears to be deliberate, the idiosyncratic reasons are explained in the foreword.

While the drawings of Debora Koff-Choplin were inspirational, and in tune with the book, I found the comic-book style illustrations a little off-key. But all in all this is a useful introduction.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 22, Autumn 2009 edition, with permission from Homeopathic Links.

Reviewed by Petra Wood, United Kingdom

"Matridonal" is Latin for "gifts of, or from, the mother". The remedies are Lac humanum, Folliculinum, Placenta humanum, Vernix caseosa, Amniotic fluid and Umbilical cord. All these substances are present at one point or another in the foetal/human development and are discarded afterwards. Their sole purpose is to create human beings. Melissa's intuition and idea has been that these remedies can be of great benefit to anybody who struggles with their process of incarnation, of finding their own identity and purpose in life. In this book Melissa shares her journey with these remedies. She shares some cases too, which illustrate the potential of healing these remedies offer.

The book tells the story of mankind, of being truly human. Therefore one of the first chapters is dedicated to the characteristics of the humanum family. This makes a fascinating and moving read.

The remedies are presented in the order that Melissa encountered them on her own journey as a homeopath and healer over the past 20 years and more. Each remedy has its own chapter, starting with a table of key features and themes, which is a great and very accessible summary. The information is not restricted to a set format but is derived from a variety of sources, for example substance information, cases and quotes from provings. The chapters are intertwined with poetry that weaves a magic spell to give deep and insightful messages.

This book is so far the only printed source of information on Amniotic fluid, Umbilical cord and Vernix caseosa (with information about Vernix also being available on the internet ).

Personally, I refer to this book in my practice at least once a week, as the issues of the humanum family come up for so many of my patients: lack of identity, of purpose, of connection, of meaning - typically resulting in depression. Melissa wrote this book from the position of deep intuitive understanding with the additional benefit of years of clinical experience. It has been long awaited, and is a real gift to our profession.

Review

This book review is reprinted from Volume 104, Number 2 summer 2011 Edition, with permission from American Journal of Homeopathic Medicine.

Reviewed by Jay Yasgur, RPh, MSc

Matridonal Remedies of the Humanum Family is the third book by Ms. Assilem and, just like the first two, The Mad Hatter's Tea Party (1994) and Women Ripening Through the Menopause (1996) (each has been revised several times), is quirky, amusing and overflowing with wisdom. This latest addition, subtitled' Gifts of the Mother,' concerns six remedies, Lac humanum, Folliculinum, Placenta humana, Vernix caseosa, Amniotic fluid, and Umbilical cord. These chapters are interspersed with several others; i.e., The Humanum Family, Enhanced Proofings, and Coming Into My Own (a lengthy case).

Right away, in her Foreword, Assilem makes the case for using the word 'proofing' instead of 'proving.'
"I use the word 'proof throughout the book, because for me is (sic) says so much better than 'prove.' To 'prove' something sounds too much as if one is testing something, which smacks of a trial. I think of a 'proofing,' as being about stepping into the energy of a substance and recording it. A 'proofreader' is someone looking over information before it is put into use. A 'proof has been described as a record of a journey in which someone has discovered an important truth, and made a record of that journey adequate enough so that a second person can walk a similar path and see a similar truth. Doesn't that sound so much more similar to what we are doing? In Chapter Six you will find my own story of the evolution of provings into what I call 'Enhanced Proofings.'"-M. Assilem, p. viii.

Matridonal remedies ('gifts of the mother') are remedies we are all familiar with on some level. Whether we've taken them or allowed them to nurture or connect, the author makes the point that there are times in our lives when we will all need them as remedies.

Upon reading the list of remedies, one finds an unfamiliar one, Vernix caseosa-the cheesy layer of 'grease' we are covered with upon our birth; a 'cheesy varnish.' Assilem calls it "The Protector' and identifies it with the following themes-unprotected, assaulted, no sense of self, skin-before presenting a case of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Like her first two books, this one is no different; it is filled with striking metaphor. As long as you give it some berth and an open mind, many 'gifts' will flow forth.

"These Matridonal remedies are about loving ourselves and loving others from a place of strength."- p. 67.

These 'lessons' are something all of us need to re-learn everyday. We need to constantly remind ourselves to 'love me,' to 'be gentle to me.' That's what everyone-the entire world-wants anyway, isn't it? More love, more kindness. Every page acted as a reminder. Well, at least to me.

This book review is reprinted with the permission from the Winter 2009 Edition of The Homeopath.

Reviewed by Jo Crocker

In this book Melissa Assilem tells the story of the homeopathic remedies of the human family - Lac humanum, Folliculinum, Placenta humana, Vernix caseosa humana, Aqua amniota humana and Umbilicus humanus. The aim, writes Melissa, is to give us insights into how these remedies have shaped our lives, connecting us to our evolution, genesis, incarnation and how they are able to reconnect us to our life purpose. As she puts it: "The story told through these remedies - of connecting with the earthly journey of our soul."

Melissa begins with an overview, drawing and connecting this group of remedies together under the classification 'The human family', and she tells us of the human story of evolution, which forms a broad signature of this group of remedies. There is a spiritual aspect to the book, each chapter beginning and ending with a poem which sets the scene of the remedy. There is also a summary of the remedy, and although some have a discussion on differentials and suggested rubrics, it would have been useful to have this for all the remedies.

The book then gives us an overview of each remedy and states to be treated. The chapter on Vernix also has remedy relationships, which would have been valuable for the other remedies. We are then presented with some cases in which patients have transformed their health and lives, but I would have liked to hear about their physical pathology. The chapters on Aqua amniota humana and Umbilical humanus were more fleshed out and I would have liked to have seen this treatment given to the other remedies, as, although they are better known, their use is still limited due to the little information known about them and proven cases.

Although it is clear that Melissa carried out indepth research and immersed herself in these remedies, and much of the information presented is both useful and fascinating, I sometimes found it difficult to separate the language of the remedy from Melissa's own voice in the book. The referencing of literature about each remedy is of variable quality, there are spelling mistakes, the most persistent being prooving and proofer for proving and prover. This appears to be deliberate, the idiosyncratic reasons are explained in the foreword.

While the drawings of Debora Koff-Choplin were inspirational, and in tune with the book, I found the comic-book style illustrations a little off-key. But all in all this is a useful introduction.

This book review is reprinted from Volume 22, Autumn 2009 edition, with permission from Homeopathic Links.

Reviewed by Petra Wood, United Kingdom

"Matridonal" is Latin for "gifts of, or from, the mother". The remedies are Lac humanum, Folliculinum, Placenta humanum, Vernix caseosa, Amniotic fluid and Umbilical cord. All these substances are present at one point or another in the foetal/human development and are discarded afterwards. Their sole purpose is to create human beings. Melissa's intuition and idea has been that these remedies can be of great benefit to anybody who struggles with their process of incarnation, of finding their own identity and purpose in life. In this book Melissa shares her journey with these remedies. She shares some cases too, which illustrate the potential of healing these remedies offer.

The book tells the story of mankind, of being truly human. Therefore one of the first chapters is dedicated to the characteristics of the humanum family. This makes a fascinating and moving read.

The remedies are presented in the order that Melissa encountered them on her own journey as a homeopath and healer over the past 20 years and more. Each remedy has its own chapter, starting with a table of key features and themes, which is a great and very accessible summary. The information is not restricted to a set format but is derived from a variety of sources, for example substance information, cases and quotes from provings. The chapters are intertwined with poetry that weaves a magic spell to give deep and insightful messages.

This book is so far the only printed source of information on Amniotic fluid, Umbilical cord and Vernix caseosa (with information about Vernix also being available on the internet ).

Personally, I refer to this book in my practice at least once a week, as the issues of the humanum family come up for so many of my patients: lack of identity, of purpose, of connection, of meaning - typically resulting in depression. Melissa wrote this book from the position of deep intuitive understanding with the additional benefit of years of clinical experience. It has been long awaited, and is a real gift to our profession.